nomad

Digital Obsession

I’m finding the Ipad more then adequate for getting ideas going. ProCreate for Ipad is working as really well and the files are easy to upload the open in photoshop. After taking some pics at riding the other week I found one that I thought would be enjoyable to turn into a depiction of a 10th century Steppe nomad. I’m working on creating a black and white under painting then glazing with color to see how the process works digitally. One of the skills I’m hoping to develop is depicting textures.

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Categories: digital art, nomad | Leave a comment

I’m having a blast with my new spindle. This is a most thoughtful spindle from an awesome friend and mentor.

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Mongolian themed laser engraved spindle contrasted with a Kazakh shyrdak rug.

Spanish Peacock Mongolian themed laser engraved top whorl spindle and Kazakh shyrdak rug.

Spanish Peacock Mongolian themed laser engraved top whorl spindle and Kazakh shyrdak rug.

Categories: nomad, spinning | Leave a comment

Another view of a handmade Phang

Categories: nomad, spinning | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Yurt Band

These are pictures of a yurt band that was attributed to weavers in Afghanistan. Unlike the yurt band we have that is attributed to South Khygryz weavers this band included cotton in it’s construction. The white yarn is cotton. It does create a very vibrant contrast. I wonder what prompted the weaver or weavers to choose a nontraditional material on an item that is so labor intensive? I would love to find more bands to study!

Categories: nomad, nomadic, Uncategorized, weaving, yurt | Leave a comment

Yurt at Maryland Sheep and Wool

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Guess what is next on the agenda?

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How to make a fingerless mitten…

Hi, this is mostly photos. The technique is the exact same concept as making a boot, hat, or bag.  Remember to allow for your hand being bigger then your wrist or you will felt it right onto your arm!  The last one I did used 2.55 oz which was way too much and it ended up being cast like.  This one used .55 oz and I’m sitting here wearing it while typing so it’s very supple and light while being soft, warm, and comfortable.

First make a pattern.  Add for shrinkage.  I typically add about 40% for the merino I use.  I actually shaved this pattern down just a hair too much.

I made four layers alternating vertical and horizontal over the pattern.

I made four layers alternating vertical and horizontal over the pattern.

You can then carefully pull the pattern out and place on top of the wool.  Take a spray bottle and spray all in the inside of the area covered by the pattern piece leaving the seam allowance dry.

You can then carefully pull the pattern out and place on top of the wool. Take a spray bottle and spray all in the inside of the area covered by the pattern piece leaving the "seam allowance" dry.

Gently felt the pattern area.  I like to cover it with tulle and then start rubbing.  Rub till fibers no longer come up with your pinch the wet area.

Gently felt the pattern area. I like to cover it with tulle and then start rubbing. Rub till fibers no longer come up with your pinch the wet area.

Insert the pattern piece over the previously felted area the lay a layer.  Bring the seam allowance over as you place each layer.  Make four layers then once again begin to work on the pattern area.

Insert the pattern piece over the previously felted area the lay a layer. Bring the "seam allowance" over as you place each layer. Make four layers then once again begin to work on the pattern area.

Very carefully, once the center is felted, support the seam allowance and slowly wet and felt it.  One it was felted I took the plastic out of the glove and placed the glove on my hand to finish the fulling process.  I rubbed it on my hand, on a glass washboard, and took it off and threw it in the sink several times as well.

Very carefully, once the center is felted, support the seam allowance and slowly wet and felt it. One it was felted I took the plastic out of the glove and placed the glove on my hand to finish the fulling process. I rubbed it on my hand, on a glass washboard, and took it off and threw it in the sink several times as well.

Im very happy with the final product.  It used .55 oz of wool and is very supple.  Im wearing right now while typing this tutorial:

I'm very happy with the final product. It used .55 oz of wool and is very supple. I'm wearing right now while typing this tutorial:>

Categories: felt, felting, nomad | 4 Comments

Cut Pile/knotted pile weaving

Although this is a thoroughly modern tapestry loom the weaving style on it is ancient.  In the Scythian graves that I’ve been studying lately lies the oldest cut pile/knotted carpet ever discovered and it is a piece that showed sophistication and skill so it was already an established craft.  This is a very easy type of weaving to pick up although it requires patience (I know, why am I trying it then?) and is very relaxing.  Actually working from a chart till you memorize your pattern will produce a better weaving though:>.  Weave or twine a border then throw two weft shots.  Then do a row of knots.  On the selvedges though it has it’s own twining going on that is important to the structure of the piece.  After a few knotted rows come back and trim the wool to the length that you want it and there you have a cut pile rug started!  For some truly amazing work see www.saralamb.com.  She has a yurt for a workshop so you know she’s got to be cool!  Cut pile and flatwoven bags have a long history of use in Central Asia as they are easily portable and stand up to a lot of abuse.  Ms. Lamb’s work is an awesome example of the old inspiring the new.  I’m looking forward to picking up her book this coming fall and furthering my rug weaving education.

sany09841

Categories: nomad, Scythian | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

More felting

Felt boots for the soon to be 3 yr old


Scythian Felt hat based on images of Scythian nomads of Central Asia.

Viking theme felt hanging made to exhibit at Scanfest 2007.

Categories: felt, felting, nomad, Scythian, viking | 1 Comment

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